N-Grams 1852

Many words that passed through the program produced predictable results. ‘County’ most often occurred with ‘said’ and ‘Texas,’ and the word ‘said’ usually was used before a noun; i.e. ‘said slave’ or ‘said negro.’ The most interesting words were descriptive adjectives like ‘complexion,’ ‘color,’ ‘copper,’ ‘negro,’ and ‘black.’ They did not occur as might have…

1856 N-grams

Certain patterns in the language of the runaway slave ads were revealed by running the n-gram program. The majority of these words were used to describe the runaways. For example, the word “negro” appeared the most throughout all three newspapers. This word was used to describe the race of the runaways. The words “man” and…

Ngrams for 1850

The Ngrams for the slave ads reveal several interesting features.  Since the Gazette, in 1850, has the largest number of ads, its Ngrams are almost always larger than the other papers.  The only exception to this is the word “negro” in the Standard which is used significantly more than the other papers.  For the word…

Ngrams 1860

For the ngrams that I ran, there seemed to be a similarities in regard to certain words and the contexts in which they are used. Words such as negro, mulatto, and other words determining race or complexion were typically used before a noun describing the sex of the runaway. Many of these words were used…

Ngrams – 1858

Boy v Man: Some interesting variance I found regarding the terms man and boy. The words seem almost interchangeable. While a man can be 23 years old, a boy can be 17, 18, or even 45 years old. One ad even uses both terms for the same slave. The term color is generally preceded by…

Ngrams 1851

After running both 5-grams and 7-grams, the 7-grams definitely proved more useful because it offered fuller phrases; this, however, was partially due to the abundance of a and the in the n-grams. On future passes, I strongly recommend adding both articles to the stop word list. Overall, there were few unexpected results. Negro was either…

Ngrams – 1848/55

Running my ads through the Ngram program there do seem to be some patterns in regards to where the various keywords fall within the ads. “Negro,” for instance nearly always appears next to the words “boy,” or “man,” also keywords, with the one exception of a reference to “negro cloth,” in clothing. The word boy…

Ngrams 1859

After running a series of n-grams on each individual newspaper and the aggregate total, few of the conclusions are surprising, because they pointed to known or suspected associations. “Color,” for instance, nearly always related to words concerning race/phenotype like dark, bright, black, yellow, copper, etc. Similarly, “Texas” typically appeared close to a city or county…

Ngrams 1857

A brief look at the grams for the year 1857 show a few interesting things: The term ‘negro’, one of the most common in the year 1857 is very often followed by the word man or boy, usually as the next word. ‘about’ or ‘named’ generally comes after man or boy, beginning a description based…