Ngrams 1859

After running a series of n-grams on each individual newspaper and the aggregate total, few of the conclusions are surprising, because they pointed to known or suspected associations. “Color,” for instance, nearly always related to words concerning race/phenotype like dark, bright, black, yellow, copper, etc. Similarly, “Texas” typically appeared close to a city or county…

Ngrams 1857

A brief look at the grams for the year 1857 show a few interesting things: The term ‘negro’, one of the most common in the year 1857 is very often followed by the word man or boy, usually as the next word. ‘about’ or ‘named’ generally comes after man or boy, beginning a description based…

Word Counts – First Pass, 1852

After a great deal of coding messes I finally figured out that the route of my problem was in the ‘Command’ key I created. Sheesh. Anyways, on to the data. The Texas State Gazette had the highest pool of ads to choose from and thus the most diversity, as well as quality of words. ‘County’…

Word Counts – First Pass, 1852

Okay, to be honest I have been having trouble getting the files to work on my computer. Something has not been synching and I still need a little time to get it to work properly. I think if I can tinker around with my computer a little more I will finally get everything to run…

Word Counts – First Pass

In the text analysis for my years, having a mildly confusing set due to the lack of resources in the Portal of Texas History for the Texas State Gazette 1848, shed little light on the issues at hand. For 1848 I have the Telegraph and Register and the Northern Standard, and for the Texas State…

Word Counts–First Pass

The word trends presented on voyant-tools.org and Python of runaway slave ads from the Clarksville Standard, the Houston Telegraph, and the Austin Gazette for the years 1849 and 1854 suggests that comparatively more slaves were advertised missing from Houston and were more frequently reported captured in Clarksville and Austin. The word counts may not accurately…

Word Counts—First Pass, 1851

After counting the word frequencies in runaway slave ads with Python, the top ten words of each newspaper and the combined set were very similar. Negro appeared as the most used word in all but the Gazette (county trumps negro). The remaining top ten words almost uniformly fell into descriptors: years and old for age,…

Word Count 1856

According to the first round of word counts for the runaway slave ads for the year 1856, the word ‘negro’ was used the most often, with a total of 42 entries in all three newspapers. The reason that this word is the most popular is rather straightforward. The owners of the runaway slaves used this term…

Word Count Comparison

Upon analyzing the word frequencies for the Telegraph, the Gazette, and the Standard, there are several interesting conclusions which can be drawn. In an overall comparison of the terms, the newspapers in general tended to use political words like “country”, “law”, “city”, and “government” while the slave ads tended to use descriptive words like “high”,…

1859 Word Counts–First Pass

A word frequency analysis of the slave ads in three papers during 1859 pointed to some interesting trends. First, within each separate paper and the aggregate sample descriptive height, feet, and inches were some of the most common words. They appeared within the top ten most frequent words of each paper, suggesting that basic estimates…